Is Fairbanks Family Dental Care open?

Yes! We are open Mon-Thu for walk-ins and by appointment. We are also available after-hours for dental emergencies.

What are their hours?

Mon-Thu 8-5

Can I schedule an appointment online?

Yes! We are on the cutting edge of convenience and technology. We have invested in an online scheduling tool which can be found by clicking here.

Is there a dentist who sees emergencies in Fairbanks, AK?

Yes, Fairbanks Family Dental Care welcomes all types of dental emergencies. We know how painful a dental emergency can be and that is why we do everything we can to see you within 24 hours of calling.

Who is the best dentist if I do not have dental insurance?

Fairbanks Family Dental Care offers simple membership plans for those who do not have insurance or who are underinsured. You pay monthly and you reap the benefits of regular exams, cleanings, dental care and more!

Which dentist in Fairbanks accepts my insurance?

At Fairbanks Family Dental Care we accept all insurances and we are in-network with many popular insurance companies.

Is there a dentist near me who has payment plans in Fairbanks, AK?

We offer a variety of payment options using services such as Scratchpay and Care Credit. We also have in-house payment plan options for certain cases.

Is there a dentist near me who offers cosmetic services, like veneers, crowns, and teeth whitening?

At Fairbanks Family Dental care, we offer all of those cosmetic services as well as try to help get your mouth as healthy as possible.

Who is the best dentist in Fairbanks, AK?

According to Google, Todd Haskin with Fairbanks Family Dental Care has the most 5-star reviews. Come see for yourself!

Why do regular dental visits matter?

Regular dental visits are important because they can help spot dental health problems early on when treatment is likely to be simpler and more affordable. They also help prevent many problems from developing in the first place. Visiting your dentist regularly is also important because some diseases or medical conditions have symptoms that can appear in the mouth.

What are some signs I should see a dentist?

  • Your teeth are sensitive to hot or cold
  • Your gums are puffy and/or they bleed when you brush or floss
  • You have fillings, crowns, dental implants, dentures, etc.
  • You don’t like the way your smile or teeth look
  • You have persistent bad breath or bad taste in your mouth
  • You are pregnant
  • You have pain or swelling in your mouth, face or neck
  • You have difficulty chewing or swallowing
  • You have a family history of gum disease or tooth decay
  • You have a medical condition such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, eating disorders or are HIV positive
  • Your mouth is often dry
  • You smoke or use other tobacco products
  • You are undergoing medical treatment such as radiation, chemotherapy or hormone replacement therapy
  • Your jaw sometimes pops or is painful when opening and closing, chewing or when you first wake up; you have an uneven bite
  • You have a spot or sore that doesn’t look or feel right in your mouth and it isn’t going away

I’m not having any symptoms. Do I still need to see a dentist?

Yes. Even if you don’t have any symptoms, you can still have dental health problems that only a dentist can diagnose. Regular dental visits will also help prevent problems from developing. Continuity of care is an important part of any health plan and dental health is no exception. Keeping your mouth healthy is an essential piece of your overall health. It’s also important to keep your dentist informed of any changes in your overall health since many medical conditions can affect your dental health too.

What can I expect during a dental checkup?

The dentist or hygienist will ask about your recent medical history, examine your mouth and decide whether or not you need x-rays. Depending on your treatment plan, the hygienist may use a special dental instruments to check your gums for gum disease. Your dentist will evaluate your overall dental health and conduct an oral cancer screening by holding your tongue with gauze, checking it and your whole mouth, then feeling your jaw and neck.

How often do I have to go to the dentist?

There is no one-size-fits-all dental treatment. Some people need to visit the dentist at least twice a year; others may need more visits. You are a unique individual, with a unique smile and unique needs when it comes to keeping your smile healthy.

What should I look for when choosing a dentist?

You may want to call or visit more than one dentist before making your decision. Dental care is a very personalized service that requires a good relationship between the dentist and the patient. During your first visit, you should be able to determine if this is the right dentist for you.

Consider the following:

  • Is the appointment schedule convenient for you?
  • Is the office easy to get to from your home or job?
  • Does the office appear to be clean, neat and orderly?
  • Was your medical and dental history recorded and placed in a permanent file?
  • Does the dentist explain techniques that will help you prevent dental health problems? Is dental health instruction provided?
  • Are special arrangements made for handling emergencies outside of office hours? (Most dentists make arrangements with a colleague or emergency referral service if they are unable to tend to emergencies.)
  • Is information provided about fees and payment plans before treatment is scheduled?
  • Is your dentist a member of the ADA? All ADA member dentists voluntarily agree to abide by the high ethical standards reflected in the member code of conduct. You and your dentist are partners in maintaining your oral health. Take time to ask questions and take notes if that will help you remember your dentist’s advice.

What’s the difference between a DDS and DMD?

If you’re looking to find a dentist you may notice that while most are listed with a “DDS”, some may be listed as “DMD”. They both mean the same thing—your dentist graduated from an accredited dental school. The DDS (Doctor of Dental Surgery) and DMD (Doctor of Dental Medicine) are the same degrees. Dentists who have a DMD or DDS have the same education. The level of education and clinical training required to earn a dental degree, and the high academic standards of dental schools are on par with those of medical schools. Upon completion of their training, dentists must pass both a rigorous national written exam and a state or regional clinical licensing exam in order to practice. In order to keep their licenses, they must meet continuing education requirements for the remainder of their careers so that they may stay up to date on the latest scientific and clinical developments.

How can I maintain a healthy smile with my dentist’s help?

Here are some tips to help you take care of your smile:

  • Healthy habits. Brushing twice a day for two minutes and flossing daily are essential for everyone, no matter how unique your mouth is. It’s the best way to fight tooth decay and gum disease.
  • Build a relationship. Continuity of care is an important part of any health plan and dental health is no exception. When your dentist sees you regularly, he or she is in a good position to catch oral problems early. For instance, catching gum disease when it’s still reversible, or cavities when they are small and are more easily treated.
  • Maintain. Keeping your mouth healthy is an essential piece of your overall health. It’s important to keep your dentist informed of any changes in your overall health as well.
  • Talk about it! Only your dentist can determine what the best treatment plan is for you. Have questions about your oral health or certain dental procedures? Start a conversation. Ask your dentist to explain step-by-step. Dentists love having satisfied, healthy patients.

How can I overcome my fear of the dentist?

At FFDC, we create a calming environment. While you wait for your appointment, help yourself to any drinks in the waiting room. Feel free to play our retro arcade, or just relax in one of our comfy chairs. During your appointment, you will be offered a blanket and to watch TV on our special ceiling-mounted TV’s. All of our doctors, hygienists, and dental assistants are trained in helping overcome dental anxiety and we will explain everything so there are no surprises during your visit. We also offer oral anxiety medication or nitrous oxide gas to help with nervousness.


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